Real Estate Investing

National Senior Citizens Day: Seniors are on the Move in the Real Estate Market

Did you know August 21st is National Senior Citizens Day? According to the United States Census, we honor senior citizens today because,

 “Throughout our history, older people have achieved much for our families, our communities, and our country. That remains true today and gives us ample reason…to reserve a special day in honor of the senior citizens who mean so much to our land.

To give proper recognition, we’re going to look at some senior-related data in the housing industry.

According to the Population Reference Bureau,

The number of Americans ages 65 and older is projected to nearly double from 52 million in 2018 to 95 million by 2060, and the 65-and-older age group’s share of the total population will rise from 16 percent to 23 percent.”

Seniors Believe in Homeownership

In a recent reportFreddie Mac compared the homeownership rates of two groups of seniors: the Good Times Cohort (born from 1931-1941) and the Previous Generations (born in the 1930s). The data shows an increase in the homeownership rate for the Good Times Cohort because seniors are now aging in place, living longer, and maintaining a high quality of life into their later years.

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This, however, does not mean all seniors are staying in place. Some are actively buying and selling homes. In the 2019 Home Buyers and Sellers Generational Trends Report, the National Association of Realtors® (NAR) showed the percentage of seniors buying and selling:

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Here are some highlights from NAR’s report:

  • Buyers ages 54 to 63 had higher median household incomes and were more likely to be married couples.

  • 12% of buyers ages 54 to 63 are first-time homebuyers, 5% (64 to 72), and 4% (73 to 93).

  • Buyers ages 54 to 63 purchased because of an interest in being closer to friends and families, job relocation, and the desire to own a home of their own.

  • Sellers 54 years and older often downsized and purchased a smaller, less expensive home than the one they sold.

  • Sellers ages 64 to 72 lived in their homes for 21 years or more.

Bottom Line

According to NAR’s report, 58% of buyers ages 64 to 72 said they need help from an agent to find the right home. The transition from a current home to a new one is significant to undertake, especially for anyone who has lived in the same house for many years. If you’re a senior thinking about the process, work with a local real estate professional who can help you make the move as smoothly as possible.

Millionaire to Millennials: The Costly Mistake of Not Buying Now

On his personal website, self-made millionaire David Bach makes a striking statement:

 “Not prioritizing homeownership is the single biggest mistake millennials are making.” 

He further stated, “Buying a home is an escalator to wealth.”

Bach explains:

“Young adults in particular aren’t hopping on this escalator, and it’s a costly mistake…If millennials don’t buy a home, their chances of actually having any wealth in this country are little to none.”

He then elaborates on the game of homeownership:

“Start by crunching the numbers…actually do the math...This way, you’re really clear on your goals and you won’t just say to yourself, ‘I’ll never afford this!'

A good rule of thumb is to make sure your total monthly housing payment doesn’t consume more than 30 percent of your take-home pay.”

Bach concludes by saying,

“Oftentimes, buying your first home means you’re not buying your dream home…You’re just getting into the market.”

Bottom Line

Whenever a well-respected millionaire gives investment advice, listeners usually clamor to hear it. This millionaire shares some simple and straightforward insights: “The fact is, you aren’t really in the game of building wealth until you own some real estate.”

Who is David Bach?

Bach is a self-made millionaire who has written nine consecutive New York Times bestsellers. His book, “The Automatic Millionaire,” spent 31 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. He is one of the only business authors in history to have four books simultaneously on the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, and USA Today bestseller lists.

He has been a contributor to NBC’s Today Show, appearing more than 100 times, as well as a regular on ABC, CBS, Fox, CNBC, CNN, Yahoo, The View, and PBS. He has also been profiled in many major publications, including the New York Times, BusinessWeek, USA Today, People, Reader’s Digest, Time, Financial Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Working Woman, Glamour, Family Circle, Redbook, Huffington Post, Business Insider, Investors’ Business Daily, and Forbes.

How to Increase Your Equity Over the Next 5 Years

Many of the questions currently surrounding the real estate industry focus on home prices and where they are heading. The most recent Home Price Expectation Survey (HPES) helps target these projected answers.

Here are the results from the Q2 2019 Survey:

  • Home values will appreciate by 4.1% in 2019

  • The average annual appreciation will be 3.2% over the next 5 years

  • The cumulative appreciation will be 16.8% by 2023

  • Even experts representing the most “bearish” quartile of the survey project a cumulative appreciation of over 6.7% by 2023

What does this mean for you?

A substantial portion of family wealth comes from home equity. As the value of a family’s home (an asset) increases, so does their equity.

Using the projections from the HPES, here is a look at the potential equity a family could earn over the next five years if they purchased a $250,000 home in January of 2019:

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Based on gains in home equity, their family wealth could increase by $42,000 over that five-year period.

Bottom Line

If you don’t yet own a home, now may be the time to purchase. Owning or moving up to your dream home could allow you to ride the increase in equity of a growing asset.

8 Real Estate Investing Mistakes to Avoid

With the stock market volatility real estate investing is becoming more popular. Here are 8 mistakes to avoid in order to make your real estate portfolio successful.

Buying Without Researching: Rushing into real estate without understanding what you’re getting can lead to bad results, says Kyle Whipple, a financial advisor and registered investment at advisor at C. Curtis Financial Group in Plymouth, Michigan. “Just because real estate is doing well doesn’t mean it will turn out to be a good investment for you.” Stock investors are often told to “buy low, sell high” and that same rule can be put to use for property investments. “You want to make sure that you’re getting a good deal and not purchasing an overpriced piece of real estate which will lower your long-term returns,” Whipple says.

Developing a Tunnel Vision: Real estate adds a new dimension to a portfolio, in terms of balancing against the risk and volatility associated with stocks. Kaufman says a common mistake is being too narrow about property focus. “Many individuals fail to diversify their real estate holdings,” he says, investing only in one local geographic area or property type. “This all-eggs-in-one-basket approach drastically increases downside risk, but investors do this because they are more comfortable investing in markets they’re familiar with.” Casting the net wider to incorporate crowdfunded investments or real estate investment trusts, known as REITs, can offer exposure to a broader group of properties and increase diversification.

Going It Alone: Owning a commercial or residential rental property can be both time- and capital-intensive. Trying to handle it all solo can require a level of focus and commitment that may not be realistic for every investor. A simple way to avoid that mistake is building a team from day one, says Kevin Ortner, president and CEO of Renters Warehouse in Minneapolis. That may involve investing with a partner or working with a broader group of individuals that includes an experienced real estate agent, an attorney who’s well-versed in property law, professional contractors and a property management company. Having support can make investing in real estate a smoother experience, with less room for error.

Relying on Bad Advice: When seeking out help in making decisions regarding property investments it’s important to go to the right sources. “Making an investment in real estate, especially for first-time investors, can be daunting and nerve-wracking,” says Rowena Dasgupta, an agent at Warburg Realty in New York. “Often, people ask friends and family for their opinion more for reassurance than for legitimate guidance.” What they should be doing instead, Dasgupta says, is seeking counsel from real estate professionals or an investor with a lengthy track record of buying and selling properties. These individuals have the knowledge and experience to provide more reliable advice.

Assuming It’s Easy: Just like stocks, mutual funds, bonds or other investments, real estate requires a certain amount of know-how to navigate. Terrell Gates, founder and CEO of Virtus Real Estate Capital, says both large and small real estate investors can make the mistake of thinking that investing in property is easier than it is. This can be exacerbated in bull markets when real estate is going strong because people tend to forget about previous downturns. “Unfortunately, to be consistently successful in real estate over the long haul requires more skill than luck,” Gates says.

Chasing Bargains: Ortner says another common pitfall among real estate investors is only looking for a deal when buying a property. “If you’re going to make long-term real estate investments, you don’t need to buy at a major discount,” Ortner says. “You just need to do deals that make sense, because, over time, you’re going to be building equity.” He says many investors limit the properties they can buy because they’re hoping to land a major discount with value, which isn’t a realistic target in the current market environment. By maintaining a long-term outlook, investors can avoid the bargain hunter mentality and focus instead on growing their property portfolio.

Not Having an Exit Strategy: Real estate can be a good buy-and-hold option but failing to develop an exit strategy can be damaging. Whipple has seen this scenario play out firsthand, with investors selling a highly appreciated piece of property without a plan in place for what to do with the funds. “They feel they are done with the real estate game and want out,” he says. “Unfortunately, they end up getting hit with a lot of taxes.” Having an end-play for real estate investments from day one can help avoid costly situations when it’s time to sell.

Overlooking the Bigger Picture: The worst mistake with real estate investing may simply be not considering how to utilize it within a broader portfolio. “Many investors make mistakes when they don’t understand how real estate fits into their overall strategy that includes diversification, long-term appreciation, liquidity needs and cash flow,” says Brent Weiss, co-founder and chief evangelist of Facet Wealth. Having a financial plan that incorporates real estate begins with understanding investment goals, risk tolerance and time horizon. These are things a financial advisor can help with. “Once investors understand what strategy will support their plan, they can determine the right mix of asset classes to create success,” Weiss says.

Article from USNews